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nuclear stops, both the united states and russia to the point they're smaller than they used to be, but certainly sufficient right now. those are strategies of an earlier era and we need to think about new policies. explain. >> well, yes, that's exactly right. we got out of the cold war by building more nuclear weapons because it scared the daylights out of the other side, and frankly it scared the daylights out of us. we're not going to get out of this situation by building more weapons. if we built 50 new missiles it would not have an affect on north korea china or russia. we need new policieses. most forces have not been tested under realistic conditions in 20 years. it's basically junk in the attic. i'm not opposed to getting rid of most of it. we need to put out declarations of what the united states will do to prevent others were using nuclear weapons. so i'm very much in favor of the declaration that we will never use nuclear weapons first. what that opens up if someone does use nuclear weapons that suspends our pledge so we could use them to punish them. we need to redesig
? the united states and russia or is israel going to give them up? doesn't seem likely. >> listen, this was first thought about in many speeches made by president ronald reagan back in the early 1980s. he made these beautiful eloquent speeches about it. this was his dream. he didn't accomplish it. there was a big summit where he was meeting with the president of russia gorbachev and so this was his dream and now we cut to today where president obama is pickling up the mantel and one of his first speech, the first in prague, he made a big speech about the elimination of nuclear weapons. in his first term, he accomplished passing the new start treaty. i do believe this is a passion of the president's, president obama's. there's a lot of things, he has a nuclear summit meeting in d.c. which pledged the elimination of nuclear weapons. >> cenk: they did this treaty and made progress. that's great news. i am curious really, like is zero possible? >> it absolutely is possible. again, to go back about five years ago they called the four states, they used to call the four mothersman, kissi
russia -- what kind of policy she needed to have with russia. >> but rula, let's be fair. sarah palin could see russia from her back yard. i mean -- >> and that's -- >> but he says susan rice doesn't know that much. >> he's the man that picked that woman. you know what? he should reflect -- mccain should reflect about how you should behave when you actually are beaten and defeated. with dignity. and you should actually question yourself about your mistakes, about your choices, and how the country wants you to behave from now on. the country chose barack obama with a large margin. >> twice. >> twice. not once. twice. and maz a message for him, that he needs to actually cooperate with barack obama, not attack him. >> joan, as i said, he questioned what ms. rice, ambassador rice knows. let me explain. ambassador rice, now the u.n. ambassador to the u.n., foreign policy adviser to john kerry, clinton administration '93 to 2001, a rhodes scholar, a ph.d. from oxford university. i mean, as was stated by rula, he didn't question condoleezza rice in 2005, when the whole world was questioning
report says the assad regime received help from russia as international sanctions are beginning to cripple the syrian economy. eight round-trip flights between moscow and damascus delivering more than 200 tons of, quote, bank notes into syria. u.s. and european sanctions include a ban on syrian currency in an attempt to slow the violence that's killed thousands of people. syria and russian officials have so far not responded to the reports. >>> overseas tens of thousands are rallying today in cairo's tahrir square protesting what they view as a blatant power grab by president mohamed horsey. with tensions mounting yesterday, morsi appeared to soften his controversial attempt to award himself near absolute power above the reach of the law. in a vaguely worded statement, morsi spokesman backtracked slightly saying that only acts of sovereignty would be immune from oversight. >>> well, u.s. consumers went big this weekend for small business saturday. millions of holiday shoppers spent a total of $5.5 billion during the third annual local business shopping event. mika spent half of
this -- >> alaska has a very narrow maritime border between a foreign country, russia, and on our other side the land boundary that we have with canada. it's funny that a comment like that was kind of made to -- i don't know, you know, as putin rears his head and comes into the airspace of the united states of america, where do they go? it's alaska. it just right over the border. >> john mccain and his fellow traveler, the little liar lindsay graham, stopped being responsible for what they say and what they do a long, long time ago. into their work, their name on the door, and their heart into their community. small business saturday is a day to show our support. a day to shop at stores owned by our friends and neighbors. and do our part for the businesses that do so much for us. on november 24th, let's get out and shop small. yeah. yeah. then how'd i get this... [ voice of dennis ] ...allstate safe driving bonus check? what is that? so weird, right? my agent, tom, said... [ voice of dennis ] ...only allstate sends you a bonus check for every six months you're accident-free... ...but i'm a w
to the extent that other countries and by you to go to -- you got to russia, libya. twenty-three countries. egypt and honduras and the philippines. the leaders of these countries must get that they are doing something wrong. >> they did it easier than in north america. the people who brought in the rule of law and property rights into the united states, the 18th and 19th century, you can't remember that. in the case of these guys, they see that they are poor relative to your wealth. it's easy for them to sycamore is the difference? they are constantly looking so they can recognize much faster. we did not realize the fact it you can determine that a piece of land went from there to year, you can also do it with a movie script. you can also do it with an idea, an invention. and certainly. all of a sudden we started seeing that people just the paper. on top of that, you build a stock market and all that leverage. get you into some kind of trouble, but without which you would not have gotten where you are today. john: property rights give us the power to prosper. thank you. we will be right ba
. >> john: you grew up in russia. >> grew up in russia. didn't have the hostess. came here. >> john: you eat only healthy food. >> that's right. other russian flavors hostess doesn't make. so i've steered clear. and my understanding is nobody really -- i don't really understand, nobody still eats hostess as a practice of -- if we want baked goods we buy hostess. am i wrong? >> john: no one eats hostess caifntle. >> they do eat the coast es cakes but it is not seen as a delicious dessert. >> john: it is. twinkies have a shelf life of seven years because they have so many preservatives in them. i want to feed someone nothing but twinkies the last ten years of their life and see how long it takes their body to decompose when they die. between twinkies and ho hos which dick morris is a fan and chock codials, i don't know if they make those anymore but the cupcakes are still huge. hostess sells wonder bread so maybe you don't have kids -- >> don't have kids. >> john: children still love this crap. >> childre
. if you go to russia and you put on discovery, it's putin's favorite channel. the people in russia think it is a russian channel so one, our content works really well but it's not just discovery. animal planet also universal, almost 90% of our -- when we develop a show for animal planet we take it everywhere in the world. i.d. as i mentioned has been very successful for us. it's a top ten network in america. in the last nine months we've launched it in over 130 countries. >> "honey boo boo" is not on france. >> tlc is a little different. animal planet, science, discovery, and now i.d., that content works. so we really have a different economic model. if we invest in a show like "gold rush" or we invest in a show with david salmani on animal planet, who will be here in a few minutes or susan lucci we take those shows around the world. those nichz, science is universal. tlc is more difficult. we have to do local content with tlc because it feels like an american channel. >> david is our guest host. we've been asking ceos and business leaders how they are planning for the end of the year wi
hd hasn't rolled out in turkey and russia. it's a big hedge for us. >> thank you for being here. >> appreciate it very much. join us tomorrow. "squawk on the street" begins right now. >>> good monday morning. welcome to "squawk on the street." i'm melissa lee with carl quintanilla, david faber and jim cramer. we kick off the week better than we had seen last week. looking at a higher open across the board after the worse weekly losses with both indices closing below the 200-day moving average on friday. looking at the action over in europe, we are seeing small gains across the board. our road map starts on capitol hill where congress returns to work tomorrow as leaders prepare to meet with the president this week on the fiscal cliff. lawmakers over the weekend sound optimistic that a deal will be reached. how likely is that? >> jeffries gets bought in a $3.7 billion deal. leucadia is described as a mini berkshire hathaway. >> a war to see who will open earliest on black friday or on thanksgiving itself as it turns out. >> first up, after coming off the worst week for the markets
where it was just the united states and russia, and now i think we have to drain the swamp. there is no other way, a sane way ahead >> you worry about rogue states, of course. you worry about terrorists. you worry about accidents. have you a movie "countdown to zero" which makes this argument in a really compelling way, and it telling the story of one russian man who actually tried to sell nuclear material to al qaeda. >> yes. >> the vignette of that was rather a low level worker in a uranium plant in the former soviet union, and he knew that by taking -- he could secrete very small amounts of highly enriched uranium, and he had a buyer that was a representative al qaeda, and the whole reason that he wanted to sell that was so that he could get a refrigerator. i mean, for him that was what -- that's all it was to him, a means to, you know, make his personal life a little better. >> queen noor, when you look at this and say you want the u.s. to lead the way and russia to lead the way in reducing nuclear arsenals. the counterargument is wait a minute all the bad actors in the
it from three sides, britain, russia, the u.s. it's a whole different ball game when you look at three interests. russian eyes, english eyes, chinese eyes. if you can see history and have empathy for others, you broaden your compassion, and you broaden. we become a member of the world. of the global community. and this is what obama has not done. now, he's basically operating as an outlier now. you asked about our criticism, it's couched in the context of 120 years of history. we started in 1900, we end now. it's a lot. and we start -- we mentioned woodrow wilson, world war ii, saying america is the savior of the world. we show that this mission to be a global policeman starts a long time ago. but it grows dangerous after the atomic bomb in 1945. >> it's a fascinating project. thoroughly enjoy the book. it's a riveting history lesson. you bring this stuff to life. i commend you. >> thank you. >> the unhold history of the united states is on showtime. the book is available now. we'll be right back. [ male announcer ] you build a reputation by not breaking down. consider the silverado 15
had to be shipped in and jim jones had begun to talk about another move, to communist russia. long live this socialist dream ♪ >> that's beautiful. >> church members were told to learn a new language. >> you had to say something in russian before you could get anything to eat. little old ladies coming up, older people, elderly people, you know, they couldn't do it. they couldn't memorize anything and he'd turn them away. >> yet unknown to parks, unknown to gosney or almost anyone outside the inner circle, jones was already preparing for their death. this is a memo written to jones by the peoples temple doctor six months before the mass suicide. it reads in part -- >> cyanide is one of the most rapidly acting poisons. i would like to give about two grams to a large pig to see how effective our batch is. >> the test apparently was never carried out, but that's not the point. while in guyana we made a startling discovery. the church had been buying cyanide long before most of the members arrived here in jonestown. cnn has learned that for at least two years the church was buying a q
's where we're headed. >> and your wife, isn't her family in russia. >> that doesn't work, if you don't know somebody who is the drunk or the weirdo in your holiday get together, that means you are. >> right. that's what i'm worried about. >> and you know, you're amazing, because like when you prepare a turkey, you can climb inside. >> mriek walike wall paper. >> i like thanksgiving, and i like the food. i like my immediate family and extended gets crazy and i remember from holidays before we used to have extended family come in and there were a couple of crazy aunts that would come. one aunt rose showed up when i was in 7th grade and passed out sexual fortune cookies and inappropriate and made me open one. >> and is she still alive? >> you know what? i don't know if she is. we had another aunt that used to come and sing songs and whistle songs to my sister's cock ateal, henry. i like the of crazy ones and embrace it, love you over at my house. >> at my house, a fancy thanksgiving out in leesburg virginia and supposed to bring something, and i brought a substance and handed and nobody
on tuesday? forensic scientists from france, russia, and switzerland will exhume the body of the late palestinian leader. then what they're going to do is take samples and test it for poisoning. arafat will be then reburied that same day in religious and military ceremonies. rumors and speculation have continued ever since arafat died suddenly in 2004 at age 75 that he may have been poisoned. >>> a newspaper editor has quit his job over topless photos of catherine, the duchess of cambridge. meeblg o'kane resigned this weekend. in september the irish paper was one of several european papers that published pictures of the duchess sun bathing topless. the photos ignited a storm of controversy and sparked legal action by the british royal family. >>> if members of congress truly want to reach across the aisle, the place to start might be between each politician's ears. why the brain may be key to bipartisansh bipartisanship. >>> but, first, a question for all you political junkes watching this morning. what was the highest margin income tax rate in u.s. history? the highest. if you know t
. french authorities have launched a murder probe. now experts from france, switzerland and russia will examine arafat's remains, also looking for a possible polonium concentration. the exhumation process will only take a few hours. the samples will then be independently analyzed in labs in russia, switzerland and france and it is unclear when first results will be made public. in his lifetime, and even after his death, yasser arafat remains a towering figure for palestinians. but despite wanting to know the circumstances behind his illness, not everyone agrees with the exhumation. i don't support the exhumation process, this man says, because the opening of the grave is disrespectful and insulting. >> i have no objection to exhuming him as long as it is done by professionals, and in full respect of the leader. >> reporter: of course i am against it, he says, it is insulting to the martyr and to the palestinian people. the palestinian authority has accused i ed israel of being be any poisoning of arafat, a claim the government refuses to comment on. it is not clear if polonium can
trying to broker a truce in gaza. that includes the u.n., russia, the eu and the united states. >>> and this story here developing every minute. stay with cnn, of course, and cnn.com for updates throughout the morning and throughout the day here on cnn. >>> now to the latest on the investigation into benghazi. who knew what and when? the spokesman for the director of national intelligence says the intelligence community, not the white house, state department or the justice department made substantive changes to talking points given to government officials. the obama administration especially u.n. ambassador susan rice has taken a lot of heat over those talking points. rice used them as a basis for comments she made on sunday talk shows five days after the deadly attack. >>> indianapolis detectives say recent explosion at an area subdivision was no accident. this homicide investigation now is under way. two people were killed. seven others injured. back on november 10th in this blast that just leveled -- look at these pictures -- leveled several homes, damaged more than 30 other
after this election. russia is proposing a solution? >> yes, they are showing why it hasn't changed anything. the presidential statement is pretty and insignificant. a security council resolution is much more significant. what the russians are doing is clearly pushing something that they know the united states will have to veto. what they are trying to do is isolate and embarrass the united states at least so far, pushing where we will have to have a veto. if i were out there, i would enjoy doing it. i'm not sure the administration will enjoy it, but i suspect it will be till it in any event. jon: so the veto is the same as the statement and the u.s. would have to certainly almost veto it? >> yes, in a public way, not and that's what the russians are trying to do. they are trying to have this additional thing in new york. they are obviously having political reasons for the russians to do this. jon: stepping back and looking at the bigger picture, why is hamas going after and launching these rockets now. does it have something to do with iran and the nuclear capabilities? >> i suspec
this week at a zoo in russia. unfortunately, their birth mother abandoned them, so this shepherd dog stepped in to nurse the little cubs. it's not been the first time the tiger mom refused to feed her babies. it happened five months ago when she gave birth to two cubs. the zoo staff was prepared this time, brought in the dog to help, and the little cubs, well, they are happy campers. arthel: i mean, as if pictures weren't enough, the vocals just kill me. i love it so much. very nice. jon: yeah, that's mom. mom doesn't look too happy, but the cubs are happy. arthel: tsa why we love dogs -- that's why we love dogs. thanks for having me. jon: it's been fun having you here today. i guess now we have to go shopping, right? arthel: yes, we do, and what are we eating? grass-fed beef. jon: see you later on the fox report, 7 p.m. eastern tonight. thank you for joining us. arthel: "america live" starts right now. rick: and we begin with a fox
with the vatican's u.n. status and it would implicitly recognize palestinian statehood. france, russia, and spain plan to back the bid. britain, the u.s. and, of course, israel oppose it. no country has veto power in the general assembly so no one can actually block it. >>> now buenos aires, argentina, for the pole dance south america championship. this is called
and israel. supporting it are major nations such as france, russia, china, spain, denmark, portugal, ireland, britain and australia expected to abstain. it will certainly have widespread implications for the fragile middle east, bill. bill: where are the israelis on this rather? what is their response, eric? >> reporter: yeah the israelis say that status could only come from direct talks with no preconditions. those peace talks have stalled because of the continued building in the west bank and continued violence we've seen in the gaza. this does come on the 65th anniversary of the partition that created the two-state solutions, something palestinians and arabs rejected for three generations. >> direct negotiations is the dna of israeli-palestinian political process. any attempt to exert external pressure on israel would serve as a setback to those who are really interested in peace. if what you're interested in is public relations, then, this whole thing is just an exercise in futility. >> reporter: but hamas is now on board. they have rejected this until this weekend when they say they wil
? ahead of russia by 2020? >> yeah. one of the ironies is over the last couple of years, the oil industry, fossil fuel, the evil fossil fuel created so many jobs and so much wealth. look at pennsylvania alone, you got to worry about them coming under attack, particularly natural gas. you got a big hollywood movie coming out, anti-fracking and all that stuff. >> steve: the president later today will meet interestingly with union leaders and business leaders, tomorrow he'll meet with ceo's and congress and try to avert the fiscal cliff. what do you make of the meeting with the union guys? >> i got a huge beef with this. unions represent only 8% of sec. there is no way in the world they should be the first ones up. by the way, this is all look just like his jobs council. nothing but academics, union leaders and gigantic businesses. where is the small business? guys, let me tell you, businesses with less than 50 please created 13,000 jobs. where would the president and the country be without them? they never get a seat at the able. we crush them, we crush any hope for recovery. >> brian: we'l
and russia, they have palest havinians udied at the universities there. they have taken the technology home. this is widespread grad rocket -- katyusha rocket technology. >> if this becomes a ground war, i asked ben the same question this changes how? >> it changes in terms of civilian casualties, it is unavoidable if you put that much firepower in there. remember there is still the question here, post arab spring, everybody is looking to see mohamed morsi, turkey, these are muslim brotherhood, if you will, governments. they're looking for them, don, to in one way or another bring hamas under control, to calm us down. nobody wants a full blown conflict. fattah doesn't want it in the west bank. israelis don't want to see it. they're feeling more insecure than they have in years. they understand the current strategy won't hold in the future. >> this man knows his stuff. appreciate it, sir. >>> developing now here in the u.s., two people are missing after an oil platform explodes in the gulf of mexico. the platform about 20 miles off the coast of grand isle, louisiana. it is not a drilling fac
with this as merit of urgency. russia already making its discomfort known, saying it's worried simply because nato is there in a military capacity. it could get drawn in, and we've seen this before. the turkish military firing back at the syrian regime when they shell into turkish territory. a very volatile situation here, and many observers thinking for once nato has that really sophisticated firepower on the border with syria, the no fly zone may end up emerging simply because it's going to be hard for people to know on the nato side, on the turkish side exactly what syrian regime activity amounts to being hostile or not. frederica. >> nick payton-walsh, thank you so much in beirut. >>> ahead on "newsroom international" anti-government rebels storm a critical city in the democratic republic of congo. now thousands are running from the violence. 's big news. presenting androgel 1.62%. both are used to treat men with low testosterone. androgel 1.62% is from the makers of the number one prescribed testosterone replacement therapy. it raises your testosterone levels, and... is concentrated, so you c
, are at stake here. and that's why this is so difficult for us. >> and -- >> -- like russia. and interesting timing for all of this, right, between this and ehud barak's, interesting to watch. jamie rubin always nice to have you with us. coming up at the top of the hour we're going to talk more about what's happening in the middle east with dr. hanan ashrawi of the palestinian liberation organization. >>> still ahead on "starting point," you know all that confetti that was raining down on thanksgiving day parades. wasn't that fabulous? well, actually, it was very sensitive information. oops. social security numbers, things like that. >>> also, the man who played one of the most beloved characters in movie history, peter billingsley, ravel if i, ta ral, talks about the new musical. we're back in just a moment. ti . because your daughter really wants that pink castle thing. and you really don't want to pay more than you have to. only citi price rewind automatically searches for the lowest price. and if it finds one, you get refunded the difference. just use your citi card and register your pur
it to obviously her area of expertise is russia. it felt to me like this piece was almost fatalistic. she is calling for more american help, she is calling for a greater american leadership role but it sended to me, read to me like she really didn't expect that to happen. in that sense i agree with her. if you look at the campaign we've just been through the president of the united states and his vice president ran on a campaign that embraced this idea of leading from behind. they believe this is working, they believe this is successful. i think the opposite, it seems very clear that secretary rice believes the opposite. i don't think that we are likely to see the united states take a more significant role in the region any time soon, given the way that the president and joe biden ran for the past year. martha: there may be an irony in the fact that susan rice, who is being considered as the next secretary of state, you know, sort of failed to see the broader picture in what happened at benghazi and we wonder what the direction of the next secretary of state would be. i just put that out
, switzerland, and russia here to watch that process and to take tests. this is all happening just as everyone commemorates the advisory, the eight-year anniversary of arafat's death. his family very upset and there has always been suspicion that arafat was murdered when he died in a french hospital in 2004. sara sidner, cnn, ramallah. >>> happening now. spreading scandal. new claims about general john allen's contacts with the woman who helped trigger the david petraeus investigation. also, another surprising new twist leads back to petraeus' former lover, paula broadwell and her e-mail trail. >>> and the president's staffing up for his second term. he appears blindsided by this sensational mess. i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." >>> the top u.s. military commander in afghanistan appears to be fighting back, trying not to be brought down by scandal, as general david petraeus was. general john allen is under investigation by the defense department, and his nomination to be the military head of nato is now on hold. at issue, allen's contacts with jill kelly, who played a role in
that could drag nato into the war, russia warned. >> translator: as i already said, the main concern is that the more weapons there are, the greater the risk that they will be used. and also any provocation could trigger it. >> reporter: winter will be unkind to the regime and its opponents. more refugees will struggle in freezing temperatures. but worse weather will also make it harder for the regime's main advantage, air power to fly. the hardest month for syrians may still be ahead. joe, i should point out what we've just seen in the report many people most traveling the intense shelling of these damascus suburbs namely there it seems to be that the regime is unable to push into these rebel strongholds there and is resorting to this heavy bombardment. but i'm sure there are people in the inner circle around president bashar al assad perhaps feeling nervous tonight. joe. >> nick paton walsh in beirut. >>> some charities are worried they might need their own lifeline with the country on the brink of a fiscal cliff. that's next. and actually share . ♪ the lexus december to remember
. and twitter lately talking about syria and talking about china and russia saying she's disgusted. but her supporters say, listen, she is a tough talker. but you know where you stand with susan rice. and she doesn't mess around. but they also say she's surprisingly down to earth. and she they say has taken the high road with this whole issue with benghazi. she isn't using inflammatory language that's been used with her and others. >> there's a question if the president does nominate her to be the next secretary of state, can she be confirmed? >> many people think that the obama administration has enough votes in the senate to confirm her. the question is, if she does get confirmed, what kind of shape will she be in? it's likely to be a very bruising confirmation process. ambassador rice if she becomes secretary would be leading the state department which has tens of thousands of employees, a huge budget. she'd be needing to get the budget through the hill. but i think, wolf, at the end of the day the most important thing is the relationship that a secretary has with the president. she's se
the obvious higher priorities, iran, the middle east, syria, north korea, china, russia, and so forth. i would imagine considerably lower priority. >> did cuba policy wax and wean with each new administration? >> it did. it did. the most ferocious opposition was in the kennedy years. jack kennedy, as i said, was really determined to do something about the cuba problem. he was obsessed. hue millñhr -- huh mill -- humiliated by castro in the bay of pigs. kennedy's obsession was vietnam so cuba declined precipitously. presidents like ford, carter, made very serious efforts to achieve that with fidel castro, the opposite of what kennedy was doing, and so, yes, cuba maxed and waned. a different kind of priority over the 50 years for 10 or 11 american presidents. >> on the reverse side, does cuba have good assets? did cuba have good assets in the u.s.? has the castro regime tried to assassinate a u.s. president? >> i don't think castro ever had a direct hand in an assassination plot against an american president, but i describe in the book some of the most startling information i acquired from cuba
, the british empire, the u.s. and russia, and how these three played geopolitically behind the scenes. >> when i saw the title of this, it makes me think of howard. i know you have done a lot of research. how important, a geeky history question, but how important was that back to forming the guts of what you have done? it's probably the most pom lar and influential a.m. tern tiff history of the united states ever written. >> it's a different kind of book than howard's book. we are both friends with howard and he was very excite d about this project. we miss him and we're building on him but in a different way. howard was talking about social forceses have shaped america. he's talk iing about domestic issues more. what we're talking about is, first of all, the american empire and, secondly, the rise of the national security state. so in some ways howard's book and our book are perfect complements, the two sides that tell the entire story together. >> i'm wondering if, you know, one of the points of this is to say u.s. presidents especially in wartime have trampled on the constitution and intern
. >> reporter: an unknown cyberattacker believed to be in russia infiltrated south carolina's tax computers and stole huge amounts of personal data. 3.8 million social security numbers. nearly 400,000 credit and debit card numbers. 650,000 business tax returns. michael debose, a former federal computer crime expert calls it a massive security breach. >> for an identity thief when you can get both social security numbers and all the other information on a tax return, that's a jackpot. >> our actual bank account and routing numbers. >> reporter: they discovered $4,000 in fraudulent out of state charges to the same bank account they use to pay state taxes for their catering business. >> we had to close out the business account. we had to close out credit cards. we had to close out debit cards. we had basically shut down our entire financial situation. >> reporter: the couple has now joined a class action lawsuit alleging state officials were negligent in protecting taxpayer data. >> you must have a lot of furious taxpayers in this state. >> and rightfully so. you know, this is information that
in early 1945. the war is winding down. russia has beaten back germany and crippled them in stalin grad, places like that. what long-term effect, shor short-term effect, did roosevelt's weakness/illness in it dealing with stalin have on all of this? >> it had an enormous effect. one of the things you see when you read the transcripts, this part of the world was not of much interest to roosevelt at that point. he was interested in the u.n. that he was trying to set up, interested in the war in japan and one interesting moment where he said there's one polish city that this been polish before the war. they were arguing about the borders. maybe you should leave it in poland. he says to stalin, let's leave it in polllanpoland. stalin seems to agree. and thus to the fates of millions of people get decided and this is now in ukraine. but it was a kind of lack of interest, lack of focus in the last meetings of roosevelt and stalin. >> a seemingly crass question that i always ask historians when they're on the show. people do these books about topics that have been written by academics for a lo
to russia and deputy secretary of state. it's going to be coming out in mid december. it will be recorded to congress and i understand it will be very, very tough on the state department for not ramping up security which many people believe could be the real issue not what was said on sunday morning television. the white house is fighting for her. >> so andrea, i just am confused but maybe you can help straighten this out. i would think lindsey graham and senator mccain for sure -- i'm not sure about kelly ayotte, have been on sunday morning shows many, many, many times. and i'll leave it there and not even go to the point that maybe at times they might have said things that they, you know, weren't completely confirming. >> what they are suggesting is that she said things for political reasons three weeks before the election. that's what lindsey graham suggested, and they were trying to mislead the american people. >> again, mike barnicle, i've asked this question before, did john mccain say that colin powell was unfit to continue as secretary of state after the information that he gave b
. russia is strong. poland, ukraine, czech republic have all slowed up. germany and uk actually better for us than france, italy and spain. >> we were just talking about why the euro has been so strong against the dollar. do you have any thoughts on that? when you go back and forth across the globe -- >> no idea. you would have predicted completely the reverse. and it didn't make much sense. draghi this morning comments about fairy land means that he's looking for readjustment. we had a couple meetings with him. we saw very it tough what he called actually a september cliff that we saw 25 companies went to see him in frank further, 23 out of the 25 excepting two agricultural companies, 23 manufacturing service companies, all said september was tough. he described it as a september cliff. >> despite the argument about who spent more, here's what i want to know.saw -- just charact like the dems didn't have a super pac. >> i didn't characterize it that way. >> no, because you lost, it was a massive -- >> i guess we'll have this conversation thousand. 150 million spent to oppose obama and
of the palestinians' legendary leader. specimens will then be taken to lack labs in russia, france, and switzerland to try to solve the enduring mystery of his death. was yasser arafat murdered? hidden behind the wall of blue tarpaulin investigators exhume the the body of yasser arafat this morning. he was buried in a frenzy of grief eight years ago. at rest in this shrine in ramallah ever since. revered by his people as a freedom fighter, and reviled by others as a terrorist. the last time a frail arafat was seen in public, he flew for treatment to paris. there he died in his hospital bed. cause of dead, never made public. his wife kept the medical report private, and rumors flew. he died of aids. he was murdered, poisoned. >> each one of us want to know the truth. what killed yasser arafat? we're obsessed about this. >> reporter: it was object after a report by al jazeera tv this year that the pressure grew on arafat's wife to agree to exhume her husband's body. al jazeera claimed that arafat was poisoned with radioactive polonium 210. al jazeera reported the scientist in switzerland found high l
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